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Street marijuana is not a sleep aid

cannabis insomnia sleep May 09, 2021

As smart, highly independent people we tend to find our own answers for problems. Rather than asking for help, we tend go looking for it and sometimes in the wrong places. Some of my clients who have been struggling to sleep have resorted to smoking marijuana to help them enjoy a better night’s sleep. They are not using medicinal cannabis which is available on prescription.  

 

Their inability to sleep or insomnia has been triggered by a variety of situations; a long-term relationship break-up, need for increased stress management techniques or high anxiety due to changes related to COVID to name a few; and the solution they have settled on is a bong of marijuana. Only to find their life unravel more.

 

Cannabis is a plant that we commonly call marijuana, ganja in herbal form or hashish in resinous form. It’s use became prevalent in the 20th century when cannabis was used for religious, spiritual, medicinal and even recreational purposes. To date, the use...

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Are you losing sleep due to sugar?

hangover sleep sugar May 03, 2021

It wasn’t long ago that we were being advised to cut back on salt. Then, we were told to cut back on sugar because researchers linked it to obesity, type-2 diabetes and a raft of other health problems.

 

Since 2016, the general advice has been to drop sugar from your diet altogether. This is, of course, not easy as so many of us have a ‘sweet tooth’, thanks to diets that are rich in sugary tastiness. Unfortunately, the more sugar we have eaten over the years, the more our body craves it now.

 

In Australia around 74% of foods available in the grocery stores or supermarkets contain added sugar (1), and it’s estimated that the average Australian consumes 18 teaspoons of sugar a day. This is higher than the recommendation from the World Health Organization (WHO) who suggests the recommended maximum daily sugar intake is 12 teaspoons a day, which is also on the high side.

 

If you’re thinking, I’m ok because I use sweeteners,...

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Is dehydration waking you up at night?

Did you know that if you do not drink more fluids than what you lose during the day, you could wake up during the night? Well, it’s true.

 

Dehydration can happen to anyone, anywhere, and at any time. It can happen when you don’t drink enough, through heavy sweating, heat, exercise, airplane travel, or the occasional hangover. Mild to moderate dehydration isn’t dangerous and can be corrected by drinking more fluids.

 

How does it affect your sleep?

Dehydration is in its most basic form is a lack of water in your body. A lack of water in your body is a result of your body losing more fluid than it is receiving. When you are asleep, you have no way of drinking or obtaining fluids. Therefore, it is natural for your body to lose more water than it receives during sleep.

 

Interestingly research shows adults who sleep only six hours per night have a higher chance of being dehydrated, compared with those who sleep 8hrs.

 

When you are...

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All YOU need to know about Sleep for the holidays

holidays sleep wellbeing Dec 13, 2020

The holidays is the perfect time to focus on getting your sleep routine back on track. Depending on how much your sleep is disrupted it could take up to a week for your body to settle into its natural sleep routine.

 

Sleep occurs as a result of three interconnected processes occurring simultaneously; the opportunity for sleep, the ability to sleep and the need for sleep. When these three processes don’t overlap, we start to experience problems with our sleep. Sure, it’s normal to experience a couple of bad night’s sleep however it is important to take note of it as for some people a bad night’s sleep can become a learned habit which will then need to be unlearned at a later stage. No matter your situation, age or life stage these three processes need to intersect in order to experience restorative sleep.  

 

Opportunity for sleep

While for many this may seem obvious, i.e. we need to set aside time for sleep, it is surprising how many...

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How Sleep protects YOUR health

insomnia sleep wellbeing Nov 16, 2020

Until the 1950s, most people thought of sleep as a passive activity. We now know it is essential for our survival and wellbeing. It provides the opportunity for our body and mind to repair themselves and it is critical for maintaining good physical and mental health.

 

Sleep allows us to conserve energy, consolidate and reconsolidate memories, process information, regulate body temperature and stimulate various nerve circuits within the brain to ensure its proper functioning. The sleeping brain also helps the body’s stress response to switch off.

 

Sleep is not a luxury.

 

We’ve all suffered through days of headache, fatigue and irritability after a bad night’s sleep for whatever reason. Sure, you can make up for it with a power nap or by sleeping it off the following two nights. But when insufficient sleep becomes the norm and you’re not getting anywhere from 7 - 9 hours of quality sleep each night, then problems start developing. 

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3 Wellbeing hacks for everyone

breathe nature sleep wellbeing Feb 12, 2020

With all of the wellbeing information available online at the tap of a finger, there’s a risk of becoming overwhelmed by it all. We are constantly exposed to new information on a daily or even hourly basis at times. Wellbeing intersects with so many parts of our lives and the research on how to maintain or improve it is exploding at the moment.

What if you could distil what’s out there into 3 wellbeing principles?

Regular amounts of sleep

It is often said that preparing for the day starts the night before. 95% of the population needs between seven and nine hours of sleep per night, how much are you getting? Sleep is not the lack of awake-ness. Sleep is an important biological process that the brain needs to lay down memories, consolidate learning, and remove toxins that have built-up from the day. Consider going to sleep and waking up at the same time every day, weekends included.

Sleep deprivation can impact your cognitive functioning, compromise your immunity to...

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